Archive for the 'P' Category



POLITICA’STER. n.s.

POLITICA'STER. n.s.

POLITICA’STER. n.s. A petty ignorant pretender to politicks.
There are quacks of all sorts; as bullies, pedants, hypo-
crites, empiricks, law-jobbers and politicasters. L’Estrange.

POE’TASTER. n.s.

POE'TASTER. n.s.

POE’TASTER. n.s. [Latin.] A vile petty poet.
Let no poetaster command or intreat
Another extemporer verses to make. Benj. Johnson.
Begin not as th’old poetaster did,
Troy’s famous war, and Priam’s fate I sing. Roscommon.
Horace hath exposed those trifling poetasters, that spend
themselves in glaring descriptions, and sewing here and there
some cloth of gold on their sackcloth. Felton.

PO’CKETBOOK. n.s.

PO'CKETBOOK. n.s.

PO’CKETBOOK. n.s. [pocket and book.] A paper book carried
in the pocket for hasty notes.
Licinius let out the offals of his meat to interest, and
kept a register of such debtors in his pocketbookArbuthnot.
Note down the matters of doubt in some pocketbook, and
take the first opportunity to get them resolved. Watts.

PLO’DDER. n.s.

PLO'DDER. n.s.

PLO’DDER. n.s. [from plod.] A dull heavy laborious man.
Study is like the heav’ns glorious sun,
That will not be deep search’d with saucy looks;
What have continual plodders ever won,
Save base authority from other’s books? Shakesp.

PLE’NIPOTENT. adj.

PLE'NIPOTENT. adj.

PLENI’POTENT. adj. [plenipotens, Lat.] Invested with full
power.
My substitutes I send you, and create
Plenipotent on earth, of matchless might
Issuing from me.  Milton’s Par. Lost, b. x.

PLEA’SEMAN. n.s.

PLEA'SEMAN. n.s.

PLEA’SEMAN. n.s. [please and man.] A pickthank; an offi-
cious fellow.
Some carry tale, some pleaseman, some slight zany,
That knows the trick to make my lady laugh,
Told our intents.  Shakesp. Love’s Labour Lost.

PLA’YDEBT. n.s.

PLA'YDEBT. n.s.

PLA’YDEBT. n.s. [play and debt.] Debt contracted by gaming.
There are multitudes of leases upon single lives, and play
debts upon joint lives. Arbuthnot.
She has several playdebts on her hand, which must be dis-
charged very suddenly.  Spectator, No 295.

PLANE’TSTRUCK. adj.

PLANE'TSTRUCK. adj.

PLANE’TSTRUCK. adj. [planet and strike.] Blasted; sidere
afflatus.
Wonder not much if thus amaz’d I look,
Since I saw you, I have been planetstruck;
A beauty, and so rare, I did descry.  Suckling.

PLA’GUY. adj.

PLA'GUY. adj.

PLA’GUY. adj. [from plague.] Vexatious; troublesome. A
low word.
Of heats,
Add one more to the plaguy bill.  Donne.
What perils do environ
The man that meddles with cold iron,
What plaguy mischiefs and mishaps
Do dog him still with after-claps.  Hudibras.

PLAIN. adv.

PLAIN. adv.

PLAIN. adv.
I. Not obscurely.
2. Distinctly; articulately.
The string of his tongue was loosed, and he spake plain.
Mar. vii. 35.
3. Simply; with rough sincerity.
Goodman Fact is allowed by every body to be a plain
spoken person, and a man of very few words; tropes and
figures are his aversion.  Addison’s Count Tariff.