Archive for the 'O' Category

To OAR. v.a.

To OAR. v.a.

To OAR. v.a.  To impel by rowing.
His bold head
‘Bove the contentious waves he kept, and oar’d
Himself with his good arms in lusty strokes
To th’shore.  Shakespeare’s Tempest.

OA’KUM. n.s.

OA'KUM. n.s.

OA’KUM. n.s. [A word probably formed by some corruption.]
Cords untwisted and reduced to hemp, with which, mingled
with pitch, leaks are stopped.
They make their oakum, wherewith they chalk the seams
of the ships, of old seer and weather beaten ropes, when they
are over spent and grown so rotten as they serve for no other
use but to make rotten oakum, which moulders and washes
away with every sea as the ships labour and are tossed.  Ral.
Some drive old oakum thro’ each seam and rift;
Their left hand does the calking-iron guide;
The rattling mallet with the right they lift. Dryden.

OA’KEN. adj.

OA'KEN. adj.

OA’KEN. adj. [from oak.] Made of oak; gathered from oak.
No nation doth equal England for oaken timber wherewith
to build ships. Bacon’s Advice to Villiers.
By lot from Jove I am the pow’r
Of this fair wood, and live in oaken bow’r. Milton.
Clad in white velvet all their troop they led,
With each an oaken chaplet on his head. Dryden.
An oaken garland to be worn on festivals, was the recom-
pense of one who had covered a citizen in battle. Addison.
He snatched a good tough oaken cudgel, and began to
brandish it. Arbuthnot’s J. Bull.

At next

At next

At next
Immediately afr: Not used now
She by whose lines proporn shd be
Examin’d, measure of all symmetry
Wm had yt ancient seen, who thot souls made
Of harmony, he wd at next have said
That harm’y ws she Donne