Archive for the 'N' Category



NOO’NDAY. adj.

NOO'NDAY. adj.

NOO’NDAY. n.s. [noon and day.] Midday.
The bird of night did sit,
Ev’n at noonday, upon the market-place,
Houting and shrieking.  Shak. Jul. Caesar.
The dimness of our intellectual eyes, Aristotle fitly com-
pares to those of an owl at noondayBoyle.

Nonusance n.s.

Nonusance. n.s.

Nonusance n.s. [non & usance]
The not using
It were not reason[ab]le to infer
fm a caution, a nonusance
or abolition; fm a thing to be
used wth discretion, not to be us’d at all Bro. V.E.

NONCONFO’RMITY. n.s.

NONCONFO'RMITY. n.s.

NONCONFO’RMITY. n.s. [non and conformity.]
I. Refusal of compliance.
The will of our maker, whether discovered by reason or
revelation, carries the highest authoirty with it; a confor-
mity or nonconformity to it, determins their actions to be
morally good or evil.  Watt’s Logick.
2. Refusal to join in the established religion.
Since the liturgy, rites, and ceremonies of our church, are
so much struck at, and all upon a plea of conscience, it will
concern us to examine the force of this plea, which our ad-
versaries are still setting up as the grand pillar and butteress
of nonconformity. South’s Sermons.
The lady will plead toleration which allows her non-
conformity in this particular.  Addison’s Spectator.

noises

noises

Sweet sound
Fm all yir groves wch wth ye heavenly noises
Of yr freest instrumts were wont to sound,
And th’hollow hills fm wch yir silver voices
were wont redoubled echoes to rebound,
Did now rebound wth nought but rueful cries
And yelling shrieks thrown up into ye skies.  Spense

NI’TTILY. adj.

NI'TTILY. adv.

NI’TTILY. adv. [from nitty.] Lousily.
One Bell was put to death at Tyburn for moving a new
rebellion; he was a man nittily needy, and therefore ad-
ventrous. Hayward.

NI’NEFOLD. n.s.

NI'NEPINS. n.s.

NI’NEFOLD. n.s. [nine and fold.] Nine times; any thing nine
times repeated.
This huge convex of fire,
Outrageous to devour, immures us round ninefold. Milt.

NI’PPER. n.s.

NI'PPER. n.s.

NI’PPER. n.s. [from nip.] A satirist. Out of use.
Ready backbiters, fore nippers, and spiteful reporters privily
of good men.  Ascham.

night

night

This is ye night
That ei[the]r makes me or foredoes me quite. Shak.

NIDIFICA’TION. n.s.

NIDIFICA'TION. n.s.

NIDIFICA’TION. n.s. [nidificatio, Latin.] The act of build-
ing nests.
That place, and that method of nidification, doth abun-
dantly answer the creature’s occasions.  Derham.

NICK. n.s.

NICK. n.s.

NICK. n.s. [nicke, Teutonick, the twinkling of an eye.]
I. Exact point of time at which there is necessity or convenience.
That great instrument of state had foreknowledge of it,
but suffered the fatal thread to be spun out to that length
for some politick respects, and then to cut it off in the very
nick. Howel’s Vocal Forest.
What in our watches that in us is sound,
So to the height and nick we up be wound,
No matter by what hand or trick. Suckling.
That trick,
Had it come in the nick,
Had touch’d us to the quick. Denham.
Though dame fortune seem to smile,
And leer upon him for a while;
She’ll after she him in the nick
Of all his glories a dog trick. Hudibras, p. i. con. 3.
And some with symbols, sighs, and tricks,
Engraved in planetary nicks,
With their own influences will fetch them
Down from their orbs, arrest and catch them. Hud.
This nick of time is the critical occasion for the gaining
of a point. L’Estrange.
2. A notch cut in any thing. [Corrupted from nick or notch.]
3. A score; a reckoning.
Launce his man told me, he lov’d her art of all nick. Shak.
4. A winning throw. [niche, Fr. a ludicrous trick.]
Come, seven’s the main,
Cries Ganymede; the usual trick
Seven, slur a fix, eleven a nick. Prior.