Archive for the 'G' Category

gyred

gyred

gyre v.a. to do round; to make
into gyres. or folds
Hamlet wth his doublet all un-
brac’d;
No hat upon his head, his stockings
loose
Ungarter’d & down gyred to his ancle;
Pale as his shirt. Shak.

To GU’TTLE. v.n.

to-guttle-vn

To GU’TTLE. v.n. [from gut.] To feed luxuriously; to
gormandise. A low word.
His jolly brother, opposite in sense,
Laughs at his thrift; and, lavish of expence,
Quaffs, crams, and guttles in his own defence. Dryden.

To gust v.a.

to-gust

To gust v.a. | gusto Lat |
To taste; to perceive
They’re here wth me already, whispering,
rounding:
Sicilia is a so forth; tis far gone
when I shall gust it last Shak

To GRUNTLE. v.n.

to-gruntle-vn

To GRUNT. To GRUNTLE. v.n. [grunnio, Latin.] To murmur like
a hog.
And neigh, and bark, and grunt, and roar and burn,
Like horse, hound, hog, bear, fire, at every turn. Shakesp.
Lament, ye swine! in gruntings send your grief;
For you, like me, have lost your sole relief. Gay’s Past.
Thy brinded boars may slumber undismay’d,
Or grunt secure beneath the chesnut shade. Tickel.
The scolding quean to louder notes doth rise,
To her full pipes the grunting hog replies;
The grunting hogs alarm the neighbours round. Swift.

greediness

greediness

Crassus fr his unsatiable gree-
dinees ws call’d ye gulph of
avarice  Raleigh

GRAMMATICA’STER. n.s.

grammaticaster-ns

GRAMMATICA’STER. n.s. [Latin.] A mean verbal pedant;
a low grammarian.
I have not vexed their language with the doubts, the re-
marks, and eternal triflings of the French grammaticasters.
Rymer’s Tragedies of the last Age.

going off

going-off

The thief had but just turn’d his back,
when up
comes an innocent Traveller,
that so soon as ever he saw the Lion
was going off again.
L’Estrange.