Archive for the 'D' Category



DELIBA’TION. n.s

delibation-ns

DELIBA’TION. n.s. [delibatio, Latin.] An essay; a taste.

defacing

defacing

defacing
Give me leave to speak as ear
nestly in ^truly commendg it, as you
have done in untruly & unkindly
defacing & slandering it
Whitgifte

DE’ARLING. n.s.

dearling-ns1

DE’ARLING. n.s. [now written darling.] Favourite.
They do feed on nectar, heavenly wise,
With Hercules and Hebe, and the rest
Of Venus’s dearlings, through her bounty blest. Spenser.

DEAD-RECKONING. n.s.

dead-reckoning-ns

DEAD-RECKONING. n.s. [a sea-term.] That estimation or
conjecture which the seamen make of the place where a ship
is, by keeping an account of her way by the log, by knowing
the course they have steered by the compass, and by rectifying
all with allowance for drift or lee-way; so that this reckon-
ing is without any observation of the sun, moon, and stars,
and is to be rectified as often as any good observation can be
had.

To DAST’ARDISE. v.a.

to-dastard-va

To DA’STARDISE. v.a. [from dastard.] To intimidate; to
deject with cowardice; to dispirit; to depress; to terrify; to
make an habitual coward.
He had such things to urge against our marriage,
As, now declar’d, would blunt my sword in battle,
And dastardise my courage. Dryden’s Don Sebastian.

DA’RKLING.

darkling-adj

DA’RKLING. [a participle, as it seems, from darkle, which
yet I have never found.] Being in the dark; being without
light: a word merely poetical.
O, wilt thou darkling leave me? do not so. Shakespeare.
Darkling stands
The varying shore o’ th’ world. Shakesp. Ant. and Cleopatra.
The wakeful bird
Sings darkling, and, in shadiest covert hid,
Tunes her nocturnal note. Milton’s Paradise Lost, b. iii.
Darkling they mourn their fate, whom Circe’s pow’r,
With words and wicked herbs, from human kind
Had alter’d, and in brutal shapes confin’d. Dryden’s Æn.

DA’NGLER. n.s.

dangler-ns

DA’NGLER. n.s. [from dangle.] A man that hangs about wo-
men only to waste time.
A dangler is of neither sex. Ralph’s Miscel.

DA’MPY. adj.

dampy-adj

DA’MPY. adj. [from damp;] Dejected; gloomy; sorrowful.
The lords did dispel dampy thoughts, which the remem-
brance of his uncle might raise, by applying him with exer-
cises and disports. Hayward.

To DAFT. v.a.

to-daft-va2

To DAFT. v.a. [contracted from do aft; that is, to throw back, to throw
off.] To toss aside; to put away with con-
tempt; to throw away slightly.
Where is his son,
The nimble-footed mad-cap prince of Wales,
And his comrades, that daft the world aside,
And bid it pass? Shakespeare’s Henry IV. p. i.
I would she had bestow’d this dotage on me: I would have
dafft all other respects, and made her half myself. Shakesp.