LU’GGAGE. n.s.

LU'GGAGE. n.s.

LU’GGAGe. n.s. [from lug.] Any thing cumbrous and un-
weildy that is to be carried away; any thing of more weight
than value.
Come bring your luggage nobly on your back. Shakesp.
What do you mean?
To doat thus on such luggageShakespeare’s Tempest.
Think not thou to find me slack, or need
Thy politick maxims, or that cumbersome
Luggage of war there shewn me. Milton’s Par. Regain’d.
How durst thou with that sullen luggage
O’th’self, old ir’n, and other baggage,
T’oppose thy lumber against us? Hudibras, p. i.
The mind of man is too light to bear much certainty
among the ruffling winds of passion and opinion; and if the
luggage be prized equally with the jewels, none will be cast
out till all be shipwrecked.  Glanv.
A lively faith will bear aloft the mind,
And leave the luggage of good works behind.  Dryden.
I am gathering up my luggage, and preparing for my jour-
ney.  Swift to Pope.

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