Archive for March, 2009



ferment

ferment

v.a.
Waining moons yir settled periods keep
To swell ye billows & fermt ye deep
Addison

FE’ATLY. adv.

featly-adv

FE’ATLY. adv. [from feat.] Neatly; nimbly; dexterously.
Foot it featly here and there,
And sweet sprites the burthen bear. Shakesp. Tempest.
The moon was up, and shot a gleamy light;
He saw a quire of ladies in a round,
That featly footing seem’d to skim the ground. Dryden.
There haply by the ruddy damsel seen,
Or shepherd-boy, they featly foot the green. Tickell.

FA’NCYSICK. adj.

fancysick-adj

FA’NCYSICK. adj. [fancy and sick.] One whose imagination
is unsound; one whose distemper is in his own mind.
‘Tis not necessity, but opinion, that makes men miserable;
and when we come to be fancysick, there’s no cure for
it. L’Estrange.

EXCU’RSIVE. adj.

excursive-adj

EXCU’RSIVE. adj. [from excurro, Latin.] Rambling; wander-
ing; deviating.
But why so far excursive? when at hand
Along these blushing borders, bright with dew,
Fair-handed Spring unbosoms every grace? Thoms. Spring.

To EXCO’GITATE. v.a.

to-excogitate-va1

To EXCO’GITATE. v.a. [excogito, Latin.] To invent; to
strike out by thinking.
If the wit of man had been to contrive this organ for him-
self; what could he have possibly excogitated more accurate?
More’s Antidote against Atheism.
The tradition of the origination of mankind seems to be
universal; but the particular methods of that origination, ex
cogitated by the heathen, were particular. Hale’s Orig. of Mank.
We shall find them to be little else than excogitated and in-
vented models, not much arising from the true image of the
things themselves. Hale’s Origin of Mankind.

To set an example

to-set-an-example

v.a. To set an example
Do villainy, do, since you profess to do’t
Like workmen: I’ll example you with
thievery Shak

ESTIVA’TION. n.s.

estivation-ns

ESTIVA’TION n.s. [æstivatio, Latin.] The act of passing
the Summer.
A grotto is a place of shade, or estivation. Bacon’s Essays.

encyclopedia

encyclopedia

In ye encyclopedia & round of knowledge
like ye grt wheels of heaven, we must observe
two circles, yt while we are daily carried about
& whirled on by ye swing & rapt of ye one,
we may maintain a natl & proper course
in ye sober wheel of ye othr Bro. V.E.

ENCRO’ACHER. n.s.

encroacher-ns

ENCRO’ACHER. n.s. [from encroach.]
I. One who seizes the possession of another by gradual and silent
means.
The bold encroachers on the deep,
Gain by degrees huge tracts of land,
‘Till Neptune, with one gen’ral sweep,
Turns all again to barren strand.  Swift.
2. One who makes slow and gradual advances beyond his
rights.
Full dress creates dignity, augments consciousness, and
keeps at a distance an encroacher. Clarissa.

ENCO’MPASSMENT. n.s.

encompassment-ns

ENCO’MPASSMENT. n.s. [from encompass.] Circumlocution;
remote tendency of talk.
Finding
By this encompassment and drift of question,
That they do know my son, come you more near. Shakes.