Archive for February, 2009

discredited

discredited

discredited
v.a.
The fooleries of some affected
novelists have discredited new
discoveries, & render’d ye very
mention suspected of vanity at
least Glanv. Scep.

To DING. v.n.

to-ding-va

To DING. v.n. To bluster; to bounce; to huff. A low word.
He huffs and dings at such a rate, because we will not spend
the little we have left to get him the title and estate of lord
Strut. Arbuthnot’s History of John Bull.

DEVO’TIONALIST. n.s.

devotionalist-ns

DEVO’TIONALIST. n.s. [from devotion.] A man zealous with-
out knowledge; superstitiously devout.

Descent

descent

Descent
state of degradation, infamy
O foul descent, yt I who erst contended
Wth Gods to sit ye highest, am now
constrained
Into a beast & mix wth bestial slime
This essence to incarnate & imbrute
Milton

To DE’NIZEN. v.a.

to-denizen-va

To DE’NIZEN. v.a. [from the noun.] To infranchise; to
make free.
Pride, lust, covetize, being several
To these three places, yet all are in all;
Mingled thus, their issue is incestuous;
Falshood is denizen’d, virtue is barbarous. Donne.

To DEMU’RE. v.n.

to-demure-va

To DEM’URE. v.n. [from the noun.] To look with an affected
modesty.
Your wife Octavia, with her modest eyes,
And still conclusion, shall acquire no honour,
Demuring upon me. Shakesp. Anthony and Cleopatra.

DELIBA’TION. n.s

delibation-ns

DELIBA’TION. n.s. [delibatio, Latin.] An essay; a taste.

defacing

defacing

defacing
Give me leave to speak as ear
nestly in ^truly commendg it, as you
have done in untruly & unkindly
defacing & slandering it
Whitgifte

DE’ARLING. n.s.

dearling-ns1

DE’ARLING. n.s. [now written darling.] Favourite.
They do feed on nectar, heavenly wise,
With Hercules and Hebe, and the rest
Of Venus’s dearlings, through her bounty blest. Spenser.

DEAD-RECKONING. n.s.

dead-reckoning-ns

DEAD-RECKONING. n.s. [a sea-term.] That estimation or
conjecture which the seamen make of the place where a ship
is, by keeping an account of her way by the log, by knowing
the course they have steered by the compass, and by rectifying
all with allowance for drift or lee-way; so that this reckon-
ing is without any observation of the sun, moon, and stars,
and is to be rectified as often as any good observation can be
had.



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